Creativity

“Every child is an artist, the problem is staying an artist when you grow up” – Pablo Picasso
 

I don’t really see myself as a naturally creative person. I think at some level we are probably all creative in some aspect. It seems that I have to work at it a little to find my natural creative outlets. And I’ve found ways to let my natural creativity come out. (making cards, seeing the beauty that still lies in old, discarded things.)

I recently came across some old artwork I created in elementary school. Some of these made me laugh really hard. And some of them seem to have come from a completely unfamiliar creative brain.

 {That’s a brontosaurus w/ a freakishly long tongue. Standing next to a tar pit.}

{You’re missing a lot of 3-D detail here, like layered construction paper hills, and cardboard behind the big balloon, making it just “pop out” from the page, and red yarn tying the basket to the balloon. You can, however, see my signature “m” birds.}

 

Because looking at these, it seems that maybe somewhere along the way, I fell into a trap of thinking too much. As Ray Bradbury said, “Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can’t try to do things. You simply must do things.”

{I call this one “Root Trapper”}

And I’ve tried figuring out the logistics of this story. Can you read it? Here, I’ll transcribe it for you.

“This Plant is called a Root Trapper. It is purple and green. It has a wheel that goes around and eats the roots. On the leaves of it, it has the plants food to attract the roots. The neat thing about it is that it is it only grows by green hills on its right.”
The right side of the picture is my rendition of The Root Trapper. It says, “This is a root trapper. With a wheele that goes eight miles per hour. and eats the roots.”

But I think the beauty of this story & creation is in just celebrating it for what it is. Not trying to figure out the logistics of how in the world this “World’s Scariest Plant” would ever survive.

I’ll leave you with some deep thoughts by Calvin & Hobbes.

“As my artist’s statement explains, my work is utterly incomprehensible and is therefore full of deep significance”-Calvin
 
 

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